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Christopher Rimmer on Capturing Namibia's Ghost Towns

  
  

Words by Charlotte Hughes.

Images by Christopher Rimmer.

Southern Son

Christopher Rimmer’s fascination with Namibia began in 2009 when he included images of the Himba people in his ground breaking ‘In Africa’ exhibition. Since then, he has visited Namibia several times and travelled the length and breadth of the country documenting the landscape, the wildlife and the people of this unique country through the lens of his camera.

Christopher Rimmer, namibia photography, namibia, kolmanskop, elizabeth bay, Angela Tandori Fine Art Gallery, Galerie Huraux, New York Art Expo

Chris’ forthcoming exhibition, ‘Sign of Life’ opens in Reims, New York and Melbourne in 2014 and features stunning, large scale photographs of the ghost towns of Elizabeth Bay and Kolmanskop.

Christopher Rimmer, namibia photography, namibia, kolmanskop, elizabeth bay, Angela Tandori Fine Art Gallery, Galerie Huraux, New York Art Expo

‘I was at Etosha Pan in 2010,’ recalls Rimmer, ‘ the BBC were out there filming for, what later became the ground breaking ‘Africa’ television series and one of the crew happened to show me some images on his phone one night of the ruins at Elizabeth Bay and Kolmanskop,  where they had been filming footage of Hyenas.’

Christopher Rimmer, namibia photography, namibia, kolmanskop, elizabeth bay, Angela Tandori Fine Art Gallery, Galerie Huraux, New York Art Expo

‘I was immediately struck by the stark beauty and the poignancy of these structures  slowly being re-claimed by the desert sands and resolved to travel there and document them before they disappeared from view completely.'

Christopher Rimmer, namibia photography, namibia, kolmanskop, elizabeth bay, Angela Tandori Fine Art Gallery, Galerie Huraux, New York Art Expo

Rimmer, who was shortlisted for Black & White Photographer of the Year in 2012, travelled to the area twice spending a total of three weeks meticulously compiling images with a large format camera, this time in glorious colour. The resulting collection is a visual examination of what he terms the ‘tragedy of lost significance’ and the ‘ultimate futility of human endeavour.

Christopher Rimmer, namibia photography, namibia, kolmanskop, elizabeth bay, Angela Tandori Fine Art Gallery, Galerie Huraux, New York Art Expo

‘I have always found the quality of light in Namibia extraordinary, he says, ‘There is no doubt that it is a paradise for photography. The way the light reflects the landscape is truly unique. This was even more so around the ghost towns of Karas. The way the light enters the buildings at various times of the day provided some amazing opportunities for ambient light photography. You have to put in the time though; you can’t expect to capture the essence of the place on a single day trip.

Christopher Rimmer, namibia photography, namibia, kolmanskop, elizabeth bay, Angela Tandori Fine Art Gallery, Galerie Huraux, New York Art Expo

‘What makes the ghost towns really impressive is how substantial the structures are. These people thought they’d be here forever yet, within barely 50 years the place was completely deserted. It’s like walking through a lost world. I found the experience incredibly moving and I have tried to articulate that sense of loss in my work.’

Christopher Rimmer, namibia photography, namibia, kolmanskop, elizabeth bay, Angela Tandori Fine Art Gallery, Galerie Huraux, New York Art Expo

The images Rimmer presents in the Sign of Life exhibition are both disturbing and beautiful and are a timely reminder of the power of nature over human enterprise in this era of climate change.

Christopher Rimmer, namibia photography, namibia, kolmanskop, elizabeth bay, Angela Tandori Fine Art Gallery, Galerie Huraux, New York Art Expo

Dates and exhibition venues for 'Sign of Life'

New York Art Expo
Pier 94, NYC, April 4 - 6

Galerie Huraux
21 rue Tambour, 51100, Reims, France. (Date to Be announced)

Angela Tandori Fine Art Gallery
55 Victoria Pde, Collingwood, Melbourne, Australia (Date to be announced)

Visit Christopher Rimmer’s website here.

Walking through Namibia

  
  

Being on foot is one of the best ways you can take in the rugged landscapes, diverse wildlife and unique flora of Namibia. In this post we will be looking at a selection of walks that showcase the variety of on-foot adventures you can have in Namibia.

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Visitors on a guided walk in Damaraland.

When in Namibia, go walking

Once you get out into Namibia’s countryside the one thing that you should realise is that almost every lodge, camp, rest camp, and game park will have a selection of walking trails that you can walk if you so choose. Many of these will be un-guided, but some of the establishments do offer guided tours.

Below are a few examples of the types of walks you can find while travelling through Namibia. The walks covered below range from traditional walking trails to more adventurous and unusual safari-style walks.

 

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 Have feet, will walk.

Walking the Waterberg

The Waterberg Plateau Park is a terrific place to visit for a few days. Game drives, diverse plant life and beautiful surroundings make the Waterberg a must-see when in Namibia.

The park does not allow visitors to drive themselves around the park but guests are encouraged to explore the park by foot. The grounds of the park are crisscrossed by a network of footpaths and hiking trails and those looking to explore the famous reserve can do so with ease.

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Map of the park's many walking trails.
(Image via African Reservations)

Walking in the Waterberg one gains an appreciation for the huge plateau itself and if you are lucky, and very quiet, you may catch a glimpse of a few of the park’s inhabitants. Keep an eye out for tracks in the sand while walking as there are several animals in the park who use some of the trails that guests do.

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Black rhino taking a dip in the Waterberg.
(Image via Africa and Beyond)

The bird life in the Waterberg is also fantastic and if you are a keen birder then you will know that bird spotting on foot is one of the best ways to catch a glimpse of some rare birds.

The walking trails are not particularly challenging and most guests, young and old, should be able to find a trail that suits their fitness level and peeks their interest.

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The trails are all clearly marked. Above is marker for the Fig Tree trail.

For more information on the Waterberg click here.

Tracking Desert Rhinos on foot.

The Desert Rhino Camp is a mobile camp run by Wilderness safaris in partnership with the Save the Rhino Trust in the Palmwag Concession area. The camp is located in an area that is close to the Skeleton Coast in the north west of Namibia. The Palmwag Concession area boasts the highest concentration of black rhinos in Africa but it is also home to a large population of desert-adapted black rhinos.

 

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A tracked rhino, hiding in the bushes.

Save the Rhino Trust regularly tracks the rhinos in the concession area as part of its efforts to conserve the endangered animals, and guests can help them out. You can, on foot, help the rangers and conservationists track these gentle giants through their natural environment- a walking experience that is as rare as it is incredible.

 

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 A family of desert-adapted rhinos.

Read a first hand account of one such experience here.

Climbing the dunes of Sossusvlei

There are several massive dunes near the iconic Sossusvlei and walking/hiking to the top of these dunes is a wonderful way to get amazing panoramic views of the famous vlei and its surroundings. There are no restrictions as to what dunes you can climb up, but there are trails that are more popular than others.

 

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Adventurers trekking up one of the many dunes near Sossusvlei.

One of the more popular trails is the one that leads to the Dead Vlei with its fossilised trees and clay pan offering numerous photo opportunities for the walkers who crest the mighty dunes surrounding the vlei.

 

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The unforgettable Deadvlei.

You can drive yourself to the dunes but you will need a 4x4 vehicle to get closer. There is a designated area where you can park your car. There are also several tour operators that will bring you to the same parking lot near the massive dunes.

 

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The walk up Big Daddy is tough, but worth it.

Click here for a concise guide to getting up and down these dunes.

 

Following the Bushman trail at Okonjima

The Bushman trail at Okonjima affords guests the unique opportunity of following in the footsteps of the indigenous San people that still live in the area just west of the Waterberg.

The trail, which you will be taken along by a guide, will give you a glimpse into how Namibia’s oldest cultural group has lived their lives for centuries. From gathering food to crafting tools and preparing food, visitors are encouraged to participate and learn about one of the oldest living civilizations on the planet.

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A guide teaching some guests about San culture.
(Image via Okonjima)

Follow this link for information on the trail and the game reserve.

Further Reading 

Above are but four examples of the different kinds of walking adventures you can have in Namibia. As mentioned there are literally hundreds of walking trails in this vast country and it is always a good idea to ask whatever establishment you are staying at if there are any interesting walks to do.

Here is a list of camps with good walking trails around them.

And for those of you who feel like a more challenging on-foot adventure, check out our post on the unforgettable Fish River hike.

Rock Climbing in Namibia with Richard Ford

  
  

Richard Ford is an experienced rock climber and has been running an adventure and climbing company called Urban Friction in Windhoek for many years now. His company specializes in rock climbing expeditions to both near and remote parts of Namibia and recently we managed to get Richard off of the rock face for long enough to conduct a short Q and A with him about rock climbing in Namibia.

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Get elevated for a different perspective on Namibia.
(Image via Urban Friction)

Can you introduce yourself and tell us briefly how you got into rock climbing?

I have been climbing since I was a kid but only got into serious/technical climbing after my return from living in Cape Town and the UK when I was introduced to Mountain Climbing South Africa’s Namibia Section. Currently, I am an Industrial Rope Access Trade Association certified rope access technician.

Where do your climbing excursions take place? And which is your favourite spot to climb in Namibia?

The day excursions take place at sites just outside Windhoek, usually about 20 km outside of the city. We are also currently developing a site that is only 10 km from the city. Most of the climbing spots are on private farms and the right of admission is reserved. One of our sites close to the city is actually an old dried up waterfall.

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Climbing is a great way to get to remote parts of a country.
(Image courtesy of Richard Ford)

But my favourite place to climb is the Spitzkoppe and it is usually a three-day weekend climbing tour. The Erongo Mountain Range is also a beautiful and fantastic site to climb.  

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In the distance, the Spitzkoppe. A perfect place for climbing.

Briefly tell us what happens on a typical climbing excursion/tour?

Day tours like our Midgard tour – includes a hike, game drive to the climbing site, lunch, and use of Midgard Country Estate facilities.

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The climbs are usually in extremely scenic parts of the country.
(Image courtesy of Richard Ford)

Do you have to be an experienced climber to join an excursion/tour?

You don’t need any experience to join the climbing tours, they are open to everybody from amateurs to professionals. The climbing sites usually have various routes ranging from easy, to moderate, to difficult.

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A guide explains to a climber how to stay safe.
(Image courtesy of Richard Ford)

Do you have any upcoming tours that prospective climbers can join?   

On Mondays we usually have a half-day climbing excursion and on Fridays, we often have a two day/weekend climbing trip. I worked as a freelance tour guide between 2001 and 2006 so I have experience in leading tours and working with clients.

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No matter how long your climb is, it will always be rewarding.
(Image courtesy of Richard Ford)

Which kind of gear does one need to go rock climbing? Does Urban Friction provide their customers with this gear?

You need shoes (although I would recommend barefoot climbing to amateurs/beginners), a dynamic rope, a harness, and a helmet- we can provide all of these to our clients. But all of these items are also available from stores like Cycle Tec Namibia if you wish to buy your own gear.

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You can always bring your own, if you want to.
(Image via Urban Friction)

How safe is rock climbing?

Rock Climbing is actually very safe if you are well aware of all the necessary precautions that need to be taken; there are strict procedures one needs to follow. I would say that rock climbing is safer than most contact sports. However, there is a calculated risk involved similar to sky diving.

But rock climbing has been around for a long time, and the equipment we use is manufactured by big commercial companies who make sure their products are safe and trustworthy. I also check my equipment on daily and monthly basis.

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A safe climber is a happy climber.
(Image courtesy of Richard Ford)

What are your thoughts on the future of rock climbing in Namibia?

I am currently working a lot with kids to create and foster a culture of rock climbing in the community… While we are on the topic of the growth potential, it would be awesome in the near future if climbing would be allowed at the Waterberg.  It’s such a beautiful place and a lot of potential to be a world-class rock climbing site. It would be great to see that happen.

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For more information and to find out how to book an excursion with Richard and Urban Friction call them on +264 81 331 2916 or visit their Facebook page here.

Camping in Namibia: Etosha National Park

  
  

If you want an authentic safari adventure in Namibia then few places are better to visit than Etosha National Park. We have a guide on travelling through the park and today we will be looking at how you can organise your very own camping adventure within, or nearby, the world-renowned park.

Initial planning

First, you need to decide which part of the park you want to be based in or nearby. There are three gates that you can use to enter Etosha: The King Nehale gate in the north, the Von Lindequist gate to the east, and finally the Andersson gate in the south.

Which gate you choose to use to enter the park with is up to you and will probably depend on which part of the country you are travelling to the park from.

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Note the gates to the North, East and South
.
(Map source Map of Namibia)

Camping in Etosha 

Namutoni Camp

This camp’s main reception area was once an old German fort and has since been developed into the primary reception for visitors entering the park. Over the years a fully functioning restaurant and lodge have been added, and more recently Namutoni has also upgraded its camping facilities.

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Shade and rest areas are all part of the camping experience at Namutoni.
(Image source Find Trip Info)

The campsite is geared towards self-catering and there is space for you to braai (BBQ) on one of the many communal fire pits. The site also has a good number of toilets and showers so that campers can freshen up after a day’s worth of safari adventures. There are also plug points if you need to charge any gear you may have brought with you.

 

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The campsite is grassy and comfortable.
(Image source Bjusterbaarlik)

One of the best things about camping at Namutoni is that you will have unfettered access to a nearby floodlit watering hole. This enables visitors and keen photographers the chance to catch a glimpse of the park’s nocturnal inhabitants.

You can book by clicking here now. 

Halali Camp

Halali is located in the middle of the park and may be more attractive to guests looking to remove themselves from the hustle and bustle of the busier camps in Etosha.

The watering hole at Halali is more secluded than the one at Namutoni and feels more private and away from the crowds. It is, like the one at Namutoni, floodlit at night so that you do not miss out on any game viewing opportunities.

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Elephants relaxing at the Halali watering hole.
(Image source John van der Woude)

The campsite’s facilities have been highly rated by campers over the years and a nice feature of the site is that there are several Mopane trees that provide shade for campers looking to relax. Shade can be invaluable when the mercury begins to rise in the summer months.

This campsite also has all the amenities one would expect including ablutions, electricity and cooking areas.

You can book by clicking here now.

Camping outside the park

There are a few camping sites a short distance outside of the Etosha’s boundaries. These camps are close enough to the national park to make visiting the famous game reserve extremely easy. Many travellers also remark that these camps, because they are removed from Etosha, are usually a bit quieter and more peaceful than the often busy safari park.

Onguma Safari Camp

(10 km’s from the Von Lindequist gate)

Onguma is actually a separate game reserve right next to Etosha. This means that guests can choose to explore Onguma’s 34 000 hectres of private game reserve, or go on guided safari drives through the neighbouring Etosha with employees from Onguma.

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Rhinos and more await within the park.
(Image source Onguma Game Reserve)

The campsite at Onguma is focussed on striking a balance between comfort and allowing you to feel like you are truly camping in the wilderness. As such each campsite has electricity, toilets and showers.

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Running water and electricity are always good things.
(Image source Onguma Game Reserve)

You can also choose to eat at the lodge’s restaurant if you are not interested in cooking for yourself. However, self-catering is encouraged as meals have to be booked in advance if you wish to eat at the restaurant. Note that you will have to bring your own food with you as there are no shops in Onguma, so come prepared.

 

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It's easy to unwind in a setting like this.
(Image source Onguma Game Reserve)

 

You can book by clicking here now.

Etosha Safari Camp

(9km’s away from the Andersson gate)

The Etosha Safari Camp is another lodge near Etosha that offers visitors the option of bringing their owns tents and setting up camp for a few nights. The campsite is exceptionally well appointed with power points all over the site, as well as sinks, showers, toilets and braai (BBQ) facilities for those who wish to self-cater.

 

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The camping is easy, and the scenery is beautiful.
(Image source Gondwana Collection Namibia)

If you don’t feel like cooking your own grub then guests at the campsite are more than welcome to eat at the main lodge’s restaurant. Campers are also invited to make use of the other facilities at the lodge like the pool area and the bar.

 

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Every camper needs a dip in a pool at some point.
(Image source Gondwana Collection Namibia)

Since the camp is so close to Etosha it is a breeze checking in and out of the national park for game drives. 

You can book by clicking here now.

Eldorado B & B Camping

(8km from the Andersson gate) 

Eldorado Farm is run by Adri Pienaar who is the third generation of his family to run the guest farm. On the farm itself there are several antelope, ostriches and wildebeest and given that it is only 8km away from Etosha’s Andersson gate you will find it very easy to get your fill of game while staying here.

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Welcome to Eldorado!
(Image source Eldorado)

There is a lodge on the farm but Eldorado’s campsite is becoming more and more popular with outdoor enthusiasts and as a result booking in advance is essential if you want to secure a place at their campsite. The Campsite at Eldorado has electricity, running water, ablutions and self-catering facilities.

 

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The campsite is very spacious.
(Image source Johan Groenewald)

 

Camping is good for you

If you enjoy the outdoors and safari then camping in or around Etosha is just the thing for you. All the camps mentioned above give you the option to either be totally self-sufficient or partly self-sufficient. With a wide selection of restaurants and amenities there’s no reason why camping cannot be both rugged and comfortable.

Capture Namibia: Photography Tips from Gary Arndt

  
  

2014 Travel Photographer of the Year, Gary Arndt has visited all seven continents and over 140 countries and territories around the world. He recently spent some time in Namibia and we managed to get him to sit still long enough to give us his top tips for capturing Namibia on film.



Tell us about your most unforgettable moment while shooting in Namibia.

I wasn't actually shooting at the time, but it was when we drove down the Long Wall. 100m straight down a giant dune with the ocean at the bottom! I had my hands firmly on the dashboard holding on for dear life. As I later learned, no matter how large the dune, they have pretty much the same degree of steepness. Driving down a large dune isn't that much different than driving down a smaller one. 

 

Every destination has its challenges and rewards; how does Namibia compare to other places you’ve photographed?

I have always found deserts to be fascinating places and some of my favorite to photograph. The incredible dunes in the Namib are unlike anything I've seen anywhere else in the world. They are big and dramatic regardless if you view them from the ground or in the air. The challenge of shooting in the desert is the sand. It gets everywhere and it can cause problems with electronics, especially with sensors in digital cameras.


Which 3 photos shot in Namibia are you most proud of and why?

It is very hard to pick just 3. But I'll go with the following:


1) A solitary tree at sunset.

During our first night camping along the Kuiseb River, our campground was marked by the only tree we saw above the river bottom during our entire trip. I managed to get this shot of the tree just minutes before sunset.

2) Damara boy smiling.

For our two days of adventure, I joined the trip going to Twyfelfontein in Damaraland. During one of our stops we visited a Damara village and I took this photo of a young man who was in a very good mood.

3) Aerial view of sand dunes.

During the conference I took a short break to fly over the dunes on a two hour flight from Swakopmund. It was an incredible experience and something I recommend that everyone do if you can. 


When going on a Namibian photographic expedition, what is your equipment of choice? And what do you never leave home without?

Unlike most photographers, I don't have a home. I am traveling continuously and I have to carry my gear with me wherever I go. For that reason, I have to pack extremely light. 

My primary camera body is a Nikon D300s. I carry 3 lenses with me: an 18-20mm VR, a 12-24mm wide angle and a 50mm f/1.4.  I usually will use the 18-200 as it is very versatile and will cover a wide range of shooting circumstances.  

 

A photographer friend is desperate to capture the best of Namibia. What top 3 tips would you give them?

1) Be aware of the sand. Try to avoid swapping lenses while you are in the desert if you can. This is one region where you are better off bringing a separate body so you don't have switch lenses.

 

2) Seek out the people. I found Namibia to be a much more diverse place than I expected. I had the pleasure of meeting some people in Damaraland and some people in the German speaking community. I would love to return and meet some of the Himba people as well people from the other tribal groups in the country. 

 

3) It is big country. I really only scratched the surface of Namibia. I was there for a conference, so I didn't get to explore as much of the country as I would have liked. Be prepared to drive long distances. If possible, take a flight over the dunes as it gives you very different perspective of the landscape.

 

featured photo  

Gary Arndt, in his own words...

In March 2007 I sold my house and have been traveling around the world ever since. Since I started traveling, I have probably done and seen more than I have in the rest of my life combined.

So far I have visited all 7 continents, over 140 countries and territories around the world, every US state and territory, 9/10 Canadian provinces, every Australian state and territory, over 125 US National Park Service sites and over 250 UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Follow Gary on Facebook, Twitter (@EverywhereTrip), Pinterest and Instagram.

 

More Photographer Tips

This part of a series of blog post interviews with professional photographers on how to Capture Namibia. Every week we'll be posting tips, tricks and amazing photographs from these impressive photographers.

Follow us to get the latest in the Capture Namibia series:

          

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 Featured Photographers  

   
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 Marsel van Oosten 

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Paul van Schalkwyk

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Bill Gozansky

 Roy van der Merwe

 Hougaard Malan

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 Matthew Hood

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