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The National Parks of Namibia- /Ai /Ais and Bwabwata

  
  

A few months ago we had a look at two national parks in Namibia that you may not have been familiar with (you can find that post here). Today we will once more be looking at two less well-known parks that you can visit in Namibia: The /Ai /Ais-Richtersveld Transfrontier Park and Bwabwata National Park.

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The /Ai /Ais-Richtersveld Transfrontier Park at sunset.
(Image via Safari Bookings)

 

/Ai /Ais-Richtersveld Transfrontier Park

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A lone quiver tree in the transfrontier park.
(Image via Peace Parks)

 

This park can be found at the southern most tip of Namibia and is jointly managed by Namibia and South Africa. This peace park straddles the border of the two countries and was formed when the /Ai /Ais Hot Springs Game Park was merged with South Africa’s Richtersveld National Park in 2003.

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A map of the peace park.
(Image via Peace Parks)

 

The reserve is part of the Succulent Karoo biome and is famed for its variety of strange and wonderful flora with the biome being home to almost a third of the world’s succulent species. The bizarre looking “halfmens” (Afrikaans for “semi-human”) can only be found in this part of southern Africa.

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Seen from a distance these rare plants appear human-like.
(Image via Ask Nature)

 

Further from the border, on the Namibian side of the park, is where you will find Africa’s largest (and the world’s second largest) canyon: The Fish River Canyon. This mighty and ancient formation is a well-known attraction to many in Namibia and the world over and is always worth visiting if you find yourself in the south of the country.

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The mighty Fish River Canyon.
(Image via Freedom Territory)

 

It’s not just the flora and the scenery that draw visitors to this park. There is an abundance of birdlife at the Orange River mouth which has led this area to be designated as an official Ramsar site. This wetland area is home to the Cape cormorant, Damara tern, Ludwig's Bustard, the Lesser Flamingo and Hartlaub's gull. The site is of particular ecological value as it is a wetland in a largely arid region.

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The mouth of the Orange River seen from the air.
(Image via Dlist)

 

While this park is one of the most biodiverse and plant rich arid biomes in the world it is unique for another, and very human, reason. It is one of the few places that the nomadic Nama people of southern Africa still live out there traditional lives.

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A group of Nama people in front of a hut in 1906.
(Image via Wikimedia)

 

Click here Namibia Wildlife Resort’s hot-spring spa that you can stay at while exploring this transfrontier park. 

AI AI

The resort is located on the Namibian side of the Orange River.
(Image via NWR)

 

Bwabwata National Park

BWAINTRO

A view of the lush naitonal park.
(Image via Foto Community)

 

This national park was officially opened in 2007 when the Mahango Game Reserve and the Caprivi Game Park where merged to form one park that is located in the riverine and lush Zambezi and the Kavango regions of north east Namibia.

MAPBWAThe location of Bwabwata.
(Image via MET)

 

As we have mentioned a few times before, the north east of Namibia is ecologically very distinct from the rest of the country. It is criss-crossed with perennial rivers and is teeming with loads of flora and fauna. In Bwabwata one of the main attractions are the migratory elephants that journey through the park.

ELLIE

A small herd of migratory elephants.
(Image via Wikimedia)

 

The park is also home to lions, cheetahs, leopards and several other large mammals including (but not limited to) African buffalo and sable antelope. As with much of Namibia’s north-east there is also an abundance of birdlife within Bwabwata’s borders. The western part of the park has been declared an Important Bird Area and is home to hundreds of species of bird.

WATTLE

Two Wattled Cranes flying into the sunset.
(Image via Travel News Namibia)

 

The park is also unique in that it is home to over 5000 people who live within the park. The permanent residents of the park have always lived in this region of Namibia and are mostly from the Khwe San Bushmen minority group. The Namibian government co-manages the park with these people and there are several community-based tourism co-ventures within the park. This ensures that people who have always lived on this land enjoy the benefits and profits of having a fully functioning national park. 

Life in the park.

 

If you want to stay a few nights within in the park then you should check out Namibia Wildlife Resort’s Popa Falls Resort.

POPA

The Popa Falls Resort seen from across the Kavango River.
(Image via NWR)

 

While exploring Namibia it can be very rewarding to veer a little bit off the traditional tourist routes, and to augment your travel itinerary with visits slightly less well-known locations like these two national parks. 

Happy planning! 

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Capture Namibia: Photography Tips from Gary Arndt

  
  

2014 Travel Photographer of the Year, Gary Arndt has visited all seven continents and over 140 countries and territories around the world. He recently spent some time in Namibia and we managed to get him to sit still long enough to give us his top tips for capturing Namibia on film.



Tell us about your most unforgettable moment while shooting in Namibia.

I wasn't actually shooting at the time, but it was when we drove down the Long Wall. 100m straight down a giant dune with the ocean at the bottom! I had my hands firmly on the dashboard holding on for dear life. As I later learned, no matter how large the dune, they have pretty much the same degree of steepness. Driving down a large dune isn't that much different than driving down a smaller one. 

 

Every destination has its challenges and rewards; how does Namibia compare to other places you’ve photographed?

I have always found deserts to be fascinating places and some of my favorite to photograph. The incredible dunes in the Namib are unlike anything I've seen anywhere else in the world. They are big and dramatic regardless if you view them from the ground or in the air. The challenge of shooting in the desert is the sand. It gets everywhere and it can cause problems with electronics, especially with sensors in digital cameras.


Which 3 photos shot in Namibia are you most proud of and why?

It is very hard to pick just 3. But I'll go with the following:


1) A solitary tree at sunset.

During our first night camping along the Kuiseb River, our campground was marked by the only tree we saw above the river bottom during our entire trip. I managed to get this shot of the tree just minutes before sunset.

2) Damara boy smiling.

For our two days of adventure, I joined the trip going to Twyfelfontein in Damaraland. During one of our stops we visited a Damara village and I took this photo of a young man who was in a very good mood.

3) Aerial view of sand dunes.

During the conference I took a short break to fly over the dunes on a two hour flight from Swakopmund. It was an incredible experience and something I recommend that everyone do if you can. 


When going on a Namibian photographic expedition, what is your equipment of choice? And what do you never leave home without?

Unlike most photographers, I don't have a home. I am traveling continuously and I have to carry my gear with me wherever I go. For that reason, I have to pack extremely light. 

My primary camera body is a Nikon D300s. I carry 3 lenses with me: an 18-20mm VR, a 12-24mm wide angle and a 50mm f/1.4.  I usually will use the 18-200 as it is very versatile and will cover a wide range of shooting circumstances.  

 

A photographer friend is desperate to capture the best of Namibia. What top 3 tips would you give them?

1) Be aware of the sand. Try to avoid swapping lenses while you are in the desert if you can. This is one region where you are better off bringing a separate body so you don't have switch lenses.

 

2) Seek out the people. I found Namibia to be a much more diverse place than I expected. I had the pleasure of meeting some people in Damaraland and some people in the German speaking community. I would love to return and meet some of the Himba people as well people from the other tribal groups in the country. 

 

3) It is big country. I really only scratched the surface of Namibia. I was there for a conference, so I didn't get to explore as much of the country as I would have liked. Be prepared to drive long distances. If possible, take a flight over the dunes as it gives you very different perspective of the landscape.

 

featured photo  

Gary Arndt, in his own words...

In March 2007 I sold my house and have been traveling around the world ever since. Since I started traveling, I have probably done and seen more than I have in the rest of my life combined.

So far I have visited all 7 continents, over 140 countries and territories around the world, every US state and territory, 9/10 Canadian provinces, every Australian state and territory, over 125 US National Park Service sites and over 250 UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Follow Gary on Facebook, Twitter (@EverywhereTrip), Pinterest and Instagram.

 

More Photographer Tips

This part of a series of blog post interviews with professional photographers on how to Capture Namibia. Every week we'll be posting tips, tricks and amazing photographs from these impressive photographers.

Follow us to get the latest in the Capture Namibia series:

          

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 Featured Photographers  

   
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 Marsel van Oosten 

 Christopher Rimmer

Paul van Schalkwyk

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Bill Gozansky

 Roy van der Merwe

 Hougaard Malan

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 Matthew Hood

 Ted Alan Stedman

 Jan & Jaye Roode

EXTREME NAMIBIA - Some of the World's Most COMPLEX Languages

  
  

In this weekly EXTREME NAMIBIA blog series we explore some of our country's extremes, and share with you practical information on how you can come and discover them for yourself.

Are you one of those people who like to pick up a bit of the local lingo when you travel? Do you pack a phrasebook and attempt to order your lunch in the native language? Do you like to greet people on the street? Well, in Namibia that might be a little harder than you think...

Namibia's San, Damara and Nama people speak what are recognised as some of the world's most ancient and complicated languages. Even the linguistically blessed are likely to struggle getting their mouths around these words - as not only are they unrelated to other languages outside southern Africa - they involve speaking with clicks! Here's a mini guide to help you out with some of the world's most complex phonetics.

A Quick Guide to Namibia's Click Languages

Namibia's Damara and Nama people speak Khoekhoe, while the San, also known as the Bushmen, speak various related languages, depending on the tribe. Khoekhoe has four click sounds, written |, ǂ, ! and ||, but even speakers of this language are baffled by the San - who use at least seven clicks! Even worse, getting your clicks mixed up spells trouble, as the same word with a different click has a completely different meaning.

Khoekhoe language lesson

For example:

  • hara = swallow

  • !hara = check out

  • |hara = dangle

  • ǂhara = repulse

Yikes! Fortunately for visitors, English is Namibia's official language so you won't have to master the world's most complex tongue! However, if you are up for a bit of a challenge, we've found some tutorials that might help you, or at least give you a bit of an insight into what Namibia sounds like:

Learn how to write and pronounce the Khoekhoe clicks:

Count to ten in Khoekhoe:


Listen to the San:

Facts about click languages and their speakers:

  • In Namibia, there are around 100,000 Damara, 60,000 Nama and 27,000 San, so you are sure to hear their languages on your travels!

  • It was suggested that the clicks developed as a way for hunters to communicate across the savannah - when spoken quietly the clicks sound less like speech and more like a broken branch, whih is less likely to disturb prey.

     

San hunters at a living museum

  • The languages are considered so complex because the clicking sounds are made at the same time as the consonant sounds, so you have to train your mouth to do two things at once!

  • Khoekhoe is a national language in Namibia. Many schools use it, and some universities teach in Khoekhoe.

Practical Information:

  • Meet the Damara and San at a Living Culture Museum, to learn more about their language as well as their culture and traditions.

  • Take a township tour in Mondesa, Swakopmund, to meet Damara and Nama residents and have an introduction to Khoekhoe in their home.

  • Stay at a joint venture lodge in Damaraland, such as Damaraland Camp. The Damara community members who manage the lodges have formed their own choirs - composed of managers, chefs and waiting staff! They entertain guests upon arrival and at mealtimes with the most wonderful songs - sung with clicks, of course.

Namibia's Living Culture Museums

  
  

There is an old African proverb which states: "If an old man dies in Africa, a whole library burns to the ground”. This proverb refers to the oral nature of the cultures on the African continent. The ancient traditional knowledge has not been written down in books, but is passed on orally from one generation to the next. His knowledge is saved in the cultural memory of the people. Without a circulation within the respective language group, this knowledge is forgotten and might be lost forever. Namibia's Living Culture Museums strive to capture and preserve this knowledge for future generations. 

Five museums, described below, are currently located throughout the country and tell the amazing story of some of Namibia's most iconic cultural groups.Museums featuring the Ovahimba and Khwe are currently in the works. These museums are instrumental in passing down traditional skills and values, as the children of the groups are actively involved in the activities of the museum. !Gamace N!aici from the Living Hunter’s Museum of the Ju/‘Hoansi points out, "When the visitors come to see our culture, they learn but our kids learn as well. That is very important for our culture."

The museums, funded and developed by the Living Culture Foundation of Namibia, not only preserve the different cultures but also give the groups an opportunity to earn an income and benefit from tourism. Travelers can visit a Living Museum and thus actively contribute to the preservation of traditional culture in Namibia. The local population is responsible for the development of the museums content and manage the operations. Proceeds from the museums benefit the local community.


The Living Museum of the Ju/’HoansiThe Ju/'Hoansi-San Museum 

The Living Museum of the Ju/’Hoansi was inaugurated in 2004 and has developed into a cultural highlight of Namibia. The main focus lies with getting to know the hunter-gatherer culture of the Kalahari San. On the same level guest have the opportunity to learn how the Ju/‘Hoansi-San traditionally light fire, make tools and weapons, and much, much more.  

 

  

 

he Living Museum of the MafweThe Living Museum of the Mafwe

In 2008 the Living Museum of the Mafwe opened in the Caprivi Strip. The Mafwe concentrate mainly on fishing and agricultural activities but also present traditional dancing ceremonies in their museum situated under huge Baobab trees.

 

 

 

 

 

The Living Museum of the DamaraThe Living Museum of the Damara

Together with the Bushmen the Damara belong to the oldest nations in Namibia. Their original culture was a mixture of an archaic hunter-gatherer culture and herders of cattle, goats and sheep. Here the visitors have the unique opportunity to get to know the fascinating traditional culture of the Damara, thus contributing to the preservation of the culture as well as to a regular income for the Damara community that built the museum.

 

 

The Living Hunter’s Museum of the Ju/’HoansiThe Living Hunter’s Museum of the Ju/’Hoansi

In 2010 the The Living Hunter’s Museum of the Ju/’Hoansi opened in the Tsumkwe region, where the San are still allowed to hunt. Here the traditional bow hunt with poisoned arrows, the digging out of spring hares and porcupines, the snare catching of guinea fowls, khoraans and other birds for the daily hunt for food has never been terminated. Visitors have the unique experience of learning the art of reading tracks and participating in a hunt.

 

 

The Living Museum of the MbunzaThe Living Museum of the Mbunza

After three years of initial building-up work the newest edition to the Living Museums finally opened at the end of October 2011: Mbunza Living Museum. An essential part of the interactive program of the Living Museum is the demonstration (and preservation) of the fishing and land cultivating culture of the Mbunza. The traditional presentation covers everything from everyday life (traditional cuisine, fire making, basket and mat weaving, etc.) to bushwalks and fishing and finally to highly specialised techniques like blacksmithing, pottery and the making of drums.

Twyfelfontein Rocks!

  
  

describe the image, Twyfelfontein (meaning "doubtful fountain"), is a massive, open air art gallery. With over 2,000 rock engravings, Twyfelfontein represent one of the largest and most important rock art concentrations in Africa. In June 2007 this striking natural red-rock gallery of tumbled boulders, smooth surfaces and history etched in stone was awarded World Heritage Site status, making it Namibia’s first and only UNESCO World Heritage Site to date.

The engravings are estimated to be up to 6,000 years old, and it is believed by many that their creators were San medicine people or shamans, who created their engravings as a means of recording the shaman’s experience among the spirits while in a trance. Among the most celebrated of the rock engravings at Twyfelfontein are a giant giraffe, a "lion man" with a hand at the end of its tail, and a dancing kudu.

35 percent of the revenue received from tourism through entrance fees at the Twyfelfontein World Heritage Site is shared with members of the local community to help them meet their basic needs. As a result, not only do tourists to the area benefit from local insight; local people are also made aware of the importance of preserving their cultural heritage for long-term benefit.

Such culture heritage preservation can be found at the nearby Living Museum of the Damara. This traditional Damara project is the only one of its kind, and the possibility to experience the traditional Damara culture in this form exists nowhere else in Namibia or in the world. Here the visitors have the unique opportunity to get to know the fascinating traditional culture of the Damara, thus contributing to the preservation of the culture as well as to a regular income for the Damara community that built the museum.

Learn more about Namibia’s unique cultures here.

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